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I would like everyone to tell us a bit about the pumps you have used and what you think of them.  Please post your reviews, I can't afford to buy that many pumps for testing so we should all share what we have tried.

(If anyone can review, from actual experience using the pump please, the Quiet One pumps, I'm interested to know what you think of them.)  (I'm also in search of a small low wattage pump that doesn't get clogged for use as backup aeration as an alternative to using air pump aeration.)

Some of the information I think we should include in our reviews
1-Brand/model of the pump
2-flow rate at some head height
3-watts
4-size fittings
5-submersible or inline or both
6-Special feartures
7-How long you have been using the pump
8-What you think of it's performance.  (Does it get clogged too easily?  Is it really nice and quiet?  That sort of thing.)
9-Would you recommend it to others?  If so what situation?
10-If you have a picture of your pump handy please share it.

Not every pump is appropriate to every situation.

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I am also using a Beckett Pump from Home Depot.  I have the FR400 pond pump(418 gal/min @1').  Mine must go up about 5 feet (drops to 115 gal/h at this height).  I've only had if for a few months, but pretty happy with it except I have it too high for what I'm trying to do, so my output isn't kicking my upper siphon)  I'm moving it over to the small garden (40 gallon tank) as it will only have about a 3' head allowing for 268 gal/hr flow so I can direct a lot back to the fish for aeration.  Moving up to the FR600 on my original garden to hopefully help with the siphon action and maybe MAYBE install an indexer valve as I'll be adding a bed to this garden very soon and I don't have a sump (too many tree roots to dig down).

 

The FR models have an adjustable valve right below the output valve on the top that allows you to add a current in your tank if you're interested in that kind of thing. 

 

These also come with easy to remove/clean mesh filter "arm" at the intake point.  Refills are available.

 

According to the manual, the

FR400 uses 115 volts / 60 hz / .68 amps / 32 Watts. 

The FR600 uses .75 amps and 34 watts.

The FR800 (512 g/h @5' head) uses .90 amps and 70 watts

 

Can anyone tell me if that's good.  Not an electrician...  Slight hum if I'm listening for it.

 

Averan said:

I've had this pump for 6 months now.  It's a Beckett 325gph submersible.  I'm running a CHOP2 with 7 5" koi in about 100 gallons of tank and a 60 gallon media bed for a total volume of about 130 gallons.  I have about a 4' head to lift from the sump up to the media bed.

At first this pump was more than enough to power the CHOP2, with enough force left over after splitting off to the media bed to create a decent flow into the fish tank.  After 6 months of bio-slime buildup, it is no longer strong enough to keep a good current flowing in the fish tank.

It is very easy to remove the outlet and screen for cleaning; which I've had to do several times.  For all the crud and leaves that float around in my sump, this pump has done pretty well with solids.  It is a magdrive, but the impeller is a disc with raised curved walls...not like the other design which is more like a propeller with blades that can get tangled and jam easily.

I have no idea how much energy it consumes though and can't find the info anywhere.  Comes with a handy 16' long cord.  Seems decently quiet, but I have nothing to compare it to.

I just purchased a QuietOne 1200 to replace it.

What about air pumps? Any recommendations? Currently have a 110 gallon tank.  Is there a model better than the others that's been tried and true?

You mention using an indexer.  If you are going to do that I suggest you will probably need a bigger pump.  The smallest pump I've ever managed to operate an indexing valve with is the Quiet One 4000 and I have to use the gravity modified version of the valve and make sure the head is minimal.  I currently recommend the Danner MD 18 to operate most of the indexing valve options in most situations.

 

As to air pumps.  I don't have a particular one to recommend but for a 100 gallon fish tank I would say you want to find an air pump that will give you 0.25 cubic feet per minute at 2 psi.  Of course if you have more than one system close enough together to use the same air pump you can always get a bigger air pump and run multiple systems from it.  Or if you are using any raft beds or external bio-filters you might want extra air for them as well.  Make sure you get an air pump that you can get replacement diaphrams and filters for since those often need replacing yearly.

Thanks!

 

 

TCLynx said:

You mention using an indexer.  If you are going to do that I suggest you will probably need a bigger pump.  The smallest pump I've ever managed to operate an indexing valve with is the Quiet One 4000 and I have to use the gravity modified version of the valve and make sure the head is minimal.  I currently recommend the Danner MD 18 to operate most of the indexing valve options in most situations.

 

As to air pumps.  I don't have a particular one to recommend but for a 100 gallon fish tank I would say you want to find an air pump that will give you 0.25 cubic feet per minute at 2 psi.  Of course if you have more than one system close enough together to use the same air pump you can always get a bigger air pump and run multiple systems from it.  Or if you are using any raft beds or external bio-filters you might want extra air for them as well.  Make sure you get an air pump that you can get replacement diaphrams and filters for since those often need replacing yearly.

I have installed Little giant pumps for years. As of late I quit using them in my ponds and water features. They just priced themselves out of the market. I have moved to beckett as well. Love the design and easy cleaning. Cant testify to their dependability yet only had it 5 months.
I have seen plastic debris covers for Danner Mag Drive pumps in pond stores.  The Mag Drive also adds heat to water more than most pumps that I know of.  This may be good for people in colder climates.

Any recommendations on a pump for a 3500 gallon pond gravity system.  I am planning on a similar system to what growing power has been doing. just lift the water and let it fall back to the pond. 

Quiet One 4000 - Mine has been running for about 18 months now with no problems.  400 gallon system - 6 way indexing valve - approximately 77,000 on/off cycles.  It's tough and consumes low wattage but I will go with the next larger pump next time and pump twice as much for half as long, to pick solids up a little better, with the same low power consumption.  

TCLynx said:

Quiet One 4000

I use the Pacific Hydrostar 68422 Submersible Utility Pump from Harbor Freight @ about $60.00/ea

Electrical Requirements 120V~ / 60Hz/2.2 A
Discharge Size
Maximum Flow Rate 1350 GPH
Maximum Head Lift 23 FT_
1 IN. NPT
Drains To 1/2 IN. of surface

For in tank use(FT to Grow beds) I add a strainer basket to the bottom to collect debris. I keep the base of the pump 12 " above the bottom to avoid accidental emptying of the tank.

For sump applications I construct a well casing of 8" PVC with an end cap at the bottom and long enough to have the top at the same height as the top of my sump tanks.. I then position the well casing with the bottom just a few inches lower than my sump tank and run a 2" line from the side of the sump tank about 1" up from the tank bottom to to the side of the well casing. The 1" at the bottom of the sump tank allows debris to settle keeping the pump free of debris.

 The pump is equipped with a 1" PVC pipe long enough to allow the pump to be lowered into the well casing and connected with a coupling to an assembly of an inline Cartridge filter (Hayward C-225) with a by-pass valve in parallel to polish the water returning to my FT's.

I have been using 3 of these pumps for about 14 months with no problems.

I would like to have an inline 110 V booster to take water to an even higher level.

I've been testing a couple new pumps lately.

And Aquaforce 2700 which uses about 150 watts according to the box and I think it is giving me about 2000 gph at almost 10 foot head.  It is a pump with one of those cages around it so leaves and debris are not likely to block it up if it is in a tank that isn't getting a heavy load of debris.  This single pump has taken over for the two Danner MD 18 (each about 145 watts) that I was running before so for about half the power I'm getting more flow.

Out in our duck system I'm testing a Laguna 2400 which only uses around 100 watts according to the box and it is giving me way more flow than the Danner MD18 had been at about 5' of head.  This is almost too much pump for the system I'm using it in but it also has the nice cage around the pump to help protect it from debris.

Of those two pumps, I think the Aquafoce may be the better choice for larger higher flow/pressure need applications since it is one of the new combo mag drive/direct drive pumps but it does use a bit more power of course (the higher you need to pump or the more pressure the more it will cost you.) It does have a nifty swivel fitting which I like but it doesn't quire match with the 1 1/2" NPT pipe fitting I would prefer to use with it.

The Laguna pump looks like a good choice for high flow at minimal head and with it's nice cage I may decide I like it better than even the Quite One pumps for minimal power applications, I might have to get one of the smaller 50 watt Laguna pumps to compare it with the Quiet One 4000 some day.

The Laguna pump fittings have a nice barb and quick connect which would be lovely if I was using the kind of tubing that fits on the barbs, But I managed to clamp a 1 1/4" rubber coupler onto their barb fitting so I was able to adapt.

FYI the above two pumps I have only been running now for a week or so but so far I kinda like them.

My one criticism about the Quiet Ones is that if you regularly need to remove the intake to clean out the impeller you will eventually destroy it. It is not really meant to come off easily, at least not like the Rio pumps' that have a nice locking ring that is easy off/on. So be sure to pre-filter them well or just don't put aquatic plants or gravel in your tank like I did!

I'm sure in most AP setups you'd never have to do this as they do handle fish poo solids really well.

Yea those ceramic impeller shafts are easy to break!

And they don't make the individual parts easily available for replacement for the quite one Pumps.

That is one nice thing about the danners, you can get the parts easily.

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