Aquaponic Gardening

A Community and Forum For Aquaponic Gardeners

Uberman is name for a Polyphasic Sleep Cycle, where one sleeps for 15 minutes every 4 hours.  

Dymaxion sleep is where on sleeps 30 minutes every 6 hours.

Everyman is a core nap of 2-4 hours, with 2-4 naps throughout the day

Permalink Reply by Carey Ma 3 hours ago

Threadjackers united! A force of its own...hehe...sorry, sorry, I can't help myself...

I've only had two paying jobs in my life and hope never to have one again. I started sleeping only four hours a night while I was in collage some thirty years ago. I did burn out about a decade ago but am back to four to six hours a night with naps during the day, whenever feel tired. There is always so much to do and learn, twenty four hours is just not enough. I use to wish I didn't need sleep. Data on Star-Trek is so lucky.

Views: 356

Replies to This Discussion

http://www.rwgrayprojects.com/synergetics/toc/toc.html

This is from the gentleman who brought us the "Geodesic Dome" and "Dymaxion Sleep" (and many other things) in the popular forms that we know them today...Sometimes an idea that helps us conceptualize in a new way from time to time can help us overcome the entropy of our fixed systems of perception...It's kind of a long read guys, but some of you might be interested. I highly suggest starting at the beginning. 

@Jon, Beautiful sentiments. Meeting at Carey pond, sure does sound a lot more appealing than the 'chat room' 

Though my vote (at least in the physical) would be your place over looking that vast blue expanse. Must be quite a sight at times.

Indeed. You're always welcome here, should you get the chance to visit. Look forward to reading the link tonight. I need to snap a few pictures and bragg about my little paradise here.

@Carey, I don't think you're crazy. In fact, what you shared was cool beyond belief. I wish to achieve the "other worldliness" of dreams.

@Jon, sounds awesome! 

I must say thank you for sharing all of you, but a special thanks to Carey and second to the sentiments that what you shared is greatly appreciated and I too hope you get some traction in forwarding your goals.  I hope you manage to turn more of the real world into your dream scape "safe place" as it sounds like a wonderful place and I'd love to meet there in dreams or real life.

So, my 13 year old daughter is having a slumber party tonight (oh joy), with seven other girls ages 11 to 15.  During dinner, the constant chatter of girls and four conversations at once, turned to dreams.  On account of my recent interest here on the forum, I started asking them details of these wild tales.  Of the eight girls, I was astounded to discover that five of them have died in their dreams (my own daughter was one of them), two of those die quite regurlarly.  Of the eight, the two who have recurring death dreams are the sweetest little girls, not at all messed in the head or "different".  One of those two, the youngest girl at 11 years old, has had a dream where she commit suicide, shot herself in the chest. And she saw the mourning of her family and dreamed her own funeral.  I asked her if she was having a hard time or any unusual stress at the time, and she said "No, totally random".  

I found this amazing, and a bit disturbing. At first I blamed TV, though perhaps nothing is to blame, and the dreams of children were equal in times of old, or worse. So then I explained the concept of lucid dreaming. Five of them have been aware that they were in a dream during a dream, but only three of them capable of influencing the direction of their dreams, and quite surprisingly the most profound of these was my daughter.  I have never discussed lucid dreaming with my family or kids.  My daughter says she commonly dreams of encounters with monsters, kidnappers, or generic bad guys.  She cannot avoid the attacks, but she can actively call for help, usually superheros (spider-man) for monsters, or me for bad guys.  Interesting stuff.  I'm aching to have a lucid dream again, but it hasn't happened since this thread was started.  Murphy strikes again.

There are new studies out (which I heard from Neil deGrasse Tyson) that say that dreams are a test for future events, a simulation of sorts. So, not entirely out of the ordinary, but that's some scary stuff.   Makes me want to make a device that has produces an it gets better video in dreams.

I can't disagree with his experience but I personally don't view dreams that way at all. And maybe that is another factor.? Each of us have different experiences prescribed by our personal needs and abilities?

@ Vlad: Please be very cautious about astral traveling. That is not dream my friend. There is good reason your spidey scenes are shrieking. Do not tangle and do not tarry. We do not belong there.

A question for you all...What is the difference between dreaming, having a vision and having a hallucination? 

I believe the difference is a vision is a abstract idea given a diagram in your head; a hallucination is random images in your head; and a dream is a hallucination, but at night. 

Carey said: 

A question for you all...What is the difference between dreaming, having a vision and having a hallucination? 

That's interesting Jon.  I consider myself a really well adjusted person, but most of my dreams (or at least the ones I remember) are pretty dark.  I would say that I die fairly regularly and most of my dreams involve fighting monsters or bad-guys to save people.  I typically feel in control to some extent, but not always capable of dictating the pace or direction of the dream.  I'm sure someone would remark that this somehow reflects my primal nature or sub-concious needs struggle with people or things, or some nonsense like that, but I almost think it's kind of yin-yang.  My real life is wonderful.  Not without difficulty and sadness from time to time, but I love my family and I have food and a roof over my head and everything that matters.  I kind of wonder if dreams are a sort of balancing act, giving my body the experience of utter sorrow and anger to balance out the truth of my reality.  (i.e. I've had dreams where my wife dies and I wake up utterly confused and depressed- then I realize that it was just a dream and I feel incredibly exhilarated)  I almost think it's our mind exercising the centers that aren't always exercised in day-to-day modern life.


Jon Parr said:

So, my 13 year old daughter is having a slumber party tonight (oh joy), with seven other girls ages 11 to 15.  During dinner, the constant chatter of girls and four conversations at once, turned to dreams.  On account of my recent interest here on the forum, I started asking them details of these wild tales.  Of the eight girls, I was astounded to discover that five of them have died in their dreams (my own daughter was one of them), two of those die quite regurlarly.  Of the eight, the two who have recurring death dreams are the sweetest little girls, not at all messed in the head or "different".  One of those two, the youngest girl at 11 years old, has had a dream where she commit suicide, shot herself in the chest. And she saw the mourning of her family and dreamed her own funeral.  I asked her if she was having a hard time or any unusual stress at the time, and she said "No, totally random".  

I found this amazing, and a bit disturbing. At first I blamed TV, though perhaps nothing is to blame, and the dreams of children were equal in times of old, or worse. So then I explained the concept of lucid dreaming. Five of them have been aware that they were in a dream during a dream, but only three of them capable of influencing the direction of their dreams, and quite surprisingly the most profound of these was my daughter.  I have never discussed lucid dreaming with my family or kids.  My daughter says she commonly dreams of encounters with monsters, kidnappers, or generic bad guys.  She cannot avoid the attacks, but she can actively call for help, usually superheros (spider-man) for monsters, or me for bad guys.  Interesting stuff.  I'm aching to have a lucid dream again, but it hasn't happened since this thread was started.  Murphy strikes again.

That is interesting Jon. Yeah I'm pretty sure that dying in your dreams is quite common, and that crap about "if you die in dream, you'll die for real", was made up by some slightly older kid (who probably already experience dying in a dream), to scare the crap out of some slightly younger kid who didn't know any better yet, and it just caught on... like Mikey from the Life commercials Pop Rocks and Soda...I remember reading some study long ago that analyzed the threatening content of children's dreams at different age brackets. It was interesting that girls almost never dreamt about being threatened by animals, whereas it was super common for boys (I forget the age groups where it was most common). What was a common feature for girls was dreaming of being threatened by an unknown older male (from another tribe perhaps). Which sort of makes sense when thought about dreams as 'threat rehearsal' in the context of our distant past (though now maybe just an evolutionary left-over)? 

I think probably some people are inclined to have lucid dreams more often than others, although once you notice, and would wish have them more often, there seem to be a number of things you can do to increase there occurrence (without polyphasic sleep necessarily). 

There is something called Reflection-Intention techniques, which rely on gaining skill in prospective remembering, as opposed to retrospective memory. ..."a localized memory faculty in the brain that specializes in recalling intentions that should be executed at the time of recognizing a predetermined signal sometime in the future..." (Einstein et al. 2005; LaBerge & Rheingold, 1990). I guess things like my non-working light switch that I mentioned earlier would fall into this category. Another easy thing you can do is, while awake and going about your daily business, is to question the present state you in, continually throughout the day. (Called Reality Testing). "Am I dreaming? Am i awake? And how do I know?..." etc...Seems to carry over into your sleep, which will then hopefully help you to realize consciously when your dreaming.

@Eric, I don't think that dreams serve only one biological purpose, or that all dreams are of the same ilk. There is definitely somthing to be said about the role they have played (and will continue to play) in the evolution of the human mind, i.e. threat rehearsal, but there are probably more than just that one type of dream. (If not, then I and the planet are totally f*ucked).

@Carey, IDK, that's a tough question. I used to think that "having a vision" was just what christians called it when another christian was "hallucinating". 


Each of us has different lives and we change through those lives so the nature and purpose of our dreams should change and vary.  Heck, just because a computer can be used to play games doesn't mean that is all it's good for.

What is a dream, vision, hallucination? Well, generally we figure dreams happens when we are sleeping and the other two would be while we are awake but I'm not sure that really matters.

Let me ask a different question, What is a weed?  It is all a matter of perception I believe.  A plant is a weed if  it is in a place you don't want it.  A vision happening when you don't want it would probably be a hallucination, a hallucination you seek could probably be a "vision".  What happens in your dreams are for you to decide.

Carey Ma said:

I can't disagree with his experience but I personally don't view dreams that way at all. And maybe that is another factor.? Each of us have different experiences prescribed by our personal needs and abilities?

@ Vlad: Please be very cautious about astral traveling. That is not dream my friend. There is good reason your spidey scenes are shrieking. Do not tangle and do not tarry. We do not belong there.

A question for you all...What is the difference between dreaming, having a vision and having a hallucination? 

I think TC once again hits the proverbial nail on the head... "It is all a matter of perception". That statement right there probably covers just about everything (ever). 

Jon, I read a lot of Descartes as a kid, so I didn't feel all that silly doing the "reality testing" bit. One of the things that helped me do it without laughing at myself was this: When you dream, you normally don't know that you are dreaming. You are convinced that what ever is happening is real, while you are dreaming it. So, how can I be certain that I am not dreaming right now?

Think about it...the very same senses and mechanisms that you rely on to know when something is 'real' or 'illusion' utterly fail you when you dreaming. So who's to say you're not dreaming right now?...And then your brain begins cataloging...pros/cons. Which is good because the devil is always in the details, and I'm coming to find that I'm not the only one who's lucid dreaming is bundled up (often) with false awakenings (where you dream you woke up and you think you are going about your day, but in 'actuality' you're still in bed dreaming. It sounds messed up, but your mind will do this. This is actually an easier scenario to realize that you are in fact dreaming (and hence go lucid), than the other way around. Meaning, you will more easily notice some little detail that is slightly askew, to tip you off to the fact this is not waking life and that you are still in fact dreaming (and that you just dreamt you woke up), than to realize that it is absurd for you to be riding a pink elephant the size of Rhode Island with man-faced dogs nipping at your heals; and that because all this is happening, you must be dreaming. It just doesn't seem to happen like that.

RSS

© 2019   Created by Sylvia Bernstein.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service