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Mineral Additives To Aquaponic Systems

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Mineral Additives To Aquaponic Systems

Group to talk about and share information about mineral additives in Aquaponic Systems.

Members: 26
Latest Activity: Oct 21, 2016

Discussion Forum

nutrients in aquaponics

Started by Jack Dunbar. Last reply by Craig Shevlin May 5, 2016. 1 Reply

Every time I have a nutrient deficiency with my plants, I have to ask the same questions and I'm sure that a lot of other aquapons feel the same way. I thought, wouldn't  be nice to have an…Continue

Mineral supplements

Started by Rick Stillwagon. Last reply by Rob Nash May 25, 2013. 1 Reply

Has anyone tried glacial rock dust and/or Azomite?  I found them to both be beneficial in the system used judiciously, and with no adverse effects to the fish.Continue

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Comment by john mark on March 17, 2014 at 8:10am

hi,i saw this video and wanted to share with you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoDCP5XhgHw

Comment by Bob Campbell on March 14, 2014 at 7:38pm

@john mark -  Azamite is a clay powder.  It's not very soluable. 

Comment by john mark on March 14, 2014 at 6:20pm

i want to try azomite but i heard it will raise ph to high. i used laterite for freshwater plants in fish tanks. i am going to try that when i set a system shortly.

thanks

john

Comment by Bob Campbell on February 25, 2014 at 4:48pm

Thank you Jordan but this is not quite the confirmation I'm looking for.  My goal is to find natural sources of various nutrients which can be supplied to a bioponic system.  If we loose the ability to just order up a bag of Sequestrene 138 or 330, I would like to be ready with a backup plan.

FE2+ is one of the most difficult micro-nutrients to render, BUT I may be barking up the wrong tree. 

It may be that the addition of organic acids would be a better way to help facilitate the conversion of iron by the plant it self.  So rather than supply iron from kelp it may be that I should be looking toward something like humic acids.

So far the best alternative has been to chelate iron with an anaerobic condition.  There is a whole thread devoted to it somewhere on this site but I can't recall the name of the method.

Comment by Jordan Erickson on February 25, 2014 at 9:32am
Kelp or kelp meal is slow release and can be used as a maintenance supplement later on.
Comment by Jordan Erickson on February 25, 2014 at 9:32am
Kelp or kelp meal is slow release and can be used as a maintenance supplement later on.
Comment by Jordan Erickson on February 25, 2014 at 9:29am
I am not too knowledgeable in plant chemistry, though you can use kelp for slight iron deficiencies, however if you plants have severe iron deficiency chlorosis, a chelated iron supplement should be used for faster absorption. I hope this helps you.
Comment by Bob Campbell on February 25, 2014 at 9:05am

Jordan I'm sorry if I was not clear, but that's what I'm asking.  Is the iron in kelp of an available chelated form?

Comment by Jordan Erickson on February 25, 2014 at 8:53am

Iron is typically added to the system in the form of Chelated Iron to supplement.

Comment by Bob Campbell on February 25, 2014 at 8:36am

I'm wondering if the iron in kelp is readily available to plants.

 

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