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Successful clones with a certain product?    

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Any of your commercial rooting hormones will work just fine. Some people prefer the gel type but  I feel it has too high a chance of contamination. Personally I like the cheap powders that I add water to, then soak the stems overnight.

Cheers

For just a few cuttings I clean a surface with 3% Hydrogen Peroxide, and make a small spot to twirl my cuttings in. 

I like Carey's method of soaking overnight, but I just give a quick dunk.  Thanks Carey, I'll have to begin soaking. 

The important thing is not to contaminate the package of growth hormone and keep everything clean.  The 3% H2O2 is a quick way to sanitize  There are some growth hormones you can add to the water of a turbo cloner.  I've never used that kind, but it makes good sense because the gels and powders gets washed off pretty quick in a turbo cloner.  You don't have to worry about that if you are just putting them in sand.

To answer your question; Michael McGroarty say's they are all good.

thanks you guys!

I found some willow and will also try that as well!

clonex :D

To each there own, but clonex states one the bottle not for eatable plants. This may just be a legal disclaimer. Don't know for sure, but don't like it.

As to type I personally prefer gels, Olivia gels have a high success rate. (With no disclaimers)

If you are looking to stay all natural room temperature water with B vitiams also work.

Best of luck.

You want to use Olivia's cloning gel if you are using it on edibles.  It doesn't have some of the cancer causing ingredients other commercial gels have such as Clonex or Rootech.  Also, you shouldn't really be concerned if the gels wash off in your cloner.  A lot of them are water soluble in which case they will work just like a cloning solution versus the gel it started out as.

Roger could you please expand as to what those cancer causing ingredients are?

I could not find anything that indicates that IBA (Indole butyric acid...which is the stuff you find in Weeping Willow branches/shoots...and the only active ingredient in Clonex...0.3%) is carcenogenic. Nor the crystal violet dye (present at a concentration of 0.0012%)...and certainly not the cellulose based gelling agent (2-Hydroxyethyl cellulose...a common thickening agent present at 1.2%)...The other 98% is water.

It seems like a pretty good bet that if Clonex were to somehow become commercially interesting to the food producing industry that it would easily obtain FDA approval. But it's not...so the FDA (nor anyone else) has never looked into it...hence the 'disclaimer'...But please, if you know of another side to this, let us know.

All I've ever been able to find on any of the ingredients are your standard toxicological studies...None of which have ever indicated that those ingredients exhibit any carcenogenic properties.

As stated to each there own,

Quote from lable- Percautionary Statements

Harmful if swallowed,inhaled or absorbed threw the skin.
Avoid breathing vapors or dust. Avoid contact with eyes or clothing.

In case of contact, immediately flush eyes or skin with plenty of water. Seek medical attention if irritation persists. If swallowed, induce vomiting.

This product is not intended for use on food crops or plants that may be used as food.

Dispose of container carefully.

End Quote:

That's scary to me.....

So use what ever you like or what works for you. To each there own.

Umm...yeah...tons of stuff we all use in and around our gardens comes with similar (or worse) warnings...Read the MSDS on your bag of builders lime, or Iron chelate product, Blue foam boards and/or the stuff it's made from, MaxiCrop etc...

Anyways, I'm specifically asking about the the "CANCER CAUSING INGREDIENTS" in Clonex that Roger mentioned (or any similar rooting hormone product).

First, it depends what you are trying to clone.  Second, rooting clones is not the only way to get clones, but let's skip that.  Third, you can just use water with absolutely no synthetic plant growth regulators ("hormones").  Tap water is best since it should contain a tiny amount of chlorine to help reduce the chance of rot or disease.

If and when I use a commercial rooting hormone, I use Rootone. It is cheap and easy to find, and I like it because I can sprinkle a little powder on a clean table, and roll the moist stems in it. A glug of liquid kelp added to the bubble cloner water has micros and pro-rooting qualities, but don't use fertilizer or fish-water until you have a good cluster of roots. Many plants shoot roots with no hormone at all, but some need all the help they can get.

Bianca, fresh willow cuttings make the best cloning solution of all, in my opinion. When gathering the willow, look for the lowest branches that have recently been covered by dirt and leaves. When living willow bark is out of direct light, the bark will quickly turn yellow, and the yellow sections will have the highest levels of indolebutyric acid (IBA). Cut these yellow sections into manageable lengths. I aim for pieces the from the size of pencils to hot dogs, but whatever is convenient. I dip them into a bucket of water with peroxide for a couple of minutes. Hydrogen peroxide kills mold, spores and single celled organisms like potential plant paothogens. Throw a handful of yellow willow cuttings right into your bubble cloner water, and leave them there until plant roots shoot. You may want to zip tie them to a brick to keep them from bouncing around and harming delicate roots. 

hmmm very interested in this as I have lots and lots of willow trees along the creek and around the pond on my farm......pretty much right out the back door.....ive took cuttings from some types of house plants.........stuck them in water and got starts, so im assuming this is what is ment by "cloning"???????? TY for the willow idea, and what all kinds of veggies does this "cloning" work with?? sorry for all the questions but im kinda new to this
 
Jon Parr said:

If and when I use a commercial rooting hormone, I use Rootone. It is cheap and easy to find, and I like it because I can sprinkle a little powder on a clean table, and roll the moist stems in it. A glug of liquid kelp added to the bubble cloner water has micros and pro-rooting qualities, but don't use fertilizer or fish-water until you have a good cluster of roots. Many plants shoot roots with no hormone at all, but some need all the help they can get.

Bianca, fresh willow cuttings make the best cloning solution of all, in my opinion. When gathering the willow, look for the lowest branches that have recently been covered by dirt and leaves. When living willow bark is out of direct light, the bark will quickly turn yellow, and the yellow sections will have the highest levels of indolebutyric acid (IBA). Cut these yellow sections into manageable lengths. I aim for pieces the from the size of pencils to hot dogs, but whatever is convenient. I dip them into a bucket of water with peroxide for a couple of minutes. Hydrogen peroxide kills mold, spores and single celled organisms like potential plant paothogens. Throw a handful of yellow willow cuttings right into your bubble cloner water, and leave them there until plant roots shoot. You may want to zip tie them to a brick to keep them from bouncing around and harming delicate roots. 

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