Aquaponic Gardening

A Community and Forum For Aquaponic Gardeners

I heard some on mention there needing to be a discussion for recipes and such. Well they didn't start one yet so here is a place for all your fish and aquaponic recipes, cleaning tips, and other such ideas.

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Here to start you off is a quote out of one of my discussion comments which I think might have triggered the "we need a recipe thread" idea.

I know it isn't exactly a recipe but the cook here doesn't really go by recipes anyway.
"We just had some catfish tonight, was great, moist and tender. Breaded and baked on top of a bed of pineapple with a hot pepper and tangerine marmalade glaze. Luscious as my mom would say."
Sounds yummy TC! We had a group of friends over last night and we made fish tacos. We fried some Tilapia (unfortunately store bought, not out of our AP yet) that was dusted with flour, cayenne pepper, black pepper and Lawry's seasoning salt. Then we make a Chipotle mayo that we spread on the tortilla. The mayo is not made mayo, we use veganaise instead since I have a little bit of a cholesterol issue. Actually I think it is better. The tacos were then finished off with some thinly sliced cabbage. Yum, one of my favorites.
Check out this list of links from the University of Arizona - http://ag.arizona.edu/azaqua/ista/recipes.htm
Here's my Teriyaki marinade recipe I used in my restaurants [proven recipe I developed over 20 years it made me a lot of money]
Equal parts soy sauce, water, and sugar, then add garlic, ginger, black pepper, white pepper to taste. You can use fresh garlic, and ginger or powdered what ever you have. Works great on just about anything. For beef I suggest smashing up a Kiwi into the mix [ its a natural tenderizer, and will turn even the toughest cuts of beef into a masterpiece] I hope you like it, and feel free to ask for any other recipes you may need. I've been cooking for over 44 years and have over a thousand recipes locked in my head [Ive got a photographic memory but sometimes I run out of film]
Dano
Dano,
Know any good recipes for Muscovy? We have lots in the freezer and the cook hasn't liked the ways he has tried to cook it so far. Will kiwi tenderize poultry meat too?

dano said:
Here's my Teriyaki marinade recipe I used in my restaurants [proven recipe I developed over 20 years it made me a lot of money]
Equal parts soy sauce, water, and sugar, then add garlic, ginger, black pepper, white pepper to taste. You can use fresh garlic, and ginger or powdered what ever you have. Works great on just about anything. For beef I suggest smashing up a Kiwi into the mix [ its a natural tenderizer, and will turn even the toughest cuts of beef into a masterpiece] I hope you like it, and feel free to ask for any other recipes you may need. I've been cooking for over 44 years and have over a thousand recipes locked in my head [Ive got a photographic memory but sometimes I run out of film]
Dano
Kiwi works great on beef and red meats as a tenderizer, but Ive never needed it on fowl. For the Muscovy duck I would try one of the classic orange duck recipes, or I was thinking cutting the up the back through the bone laying it out flat, and rubbing it generously with a Jamaican jerk seasoning,[both sides] then slow roasting it.Maybe smoking it also with the jerk. The teriyaki marinade should also work great for the duck.
The muscovy isn't really like other duck, it is rather lean and not as oily as the duck most people are used to.

dano said:
Kiwi works great on beef and red meats as a tenderizer, but Ive never needed it on fowl. For the Muscovy duck I would try one of the classic orange duck recipes, or I was thinking cutting the up the back through the bone laying it out flat, and rubbing it generously with a Jamaican jerk seasoning,[both sides] then slow roasting it.Maybe smoking it also with the jerk. The teriyaki marinade should also work great for the duck.

I'm sure I can come up with some of my recipes as time goes on, but for some reason, this popped into mind.   A kitchen tip worth sharing.

When you cut up onions, if the fumes tend to make you cry, try lighting a candle before you begin to cut your onion.   Keep it closeby while you are cutting the onion.  The flame burns some of the gases the onion gives off, and you are MUCH less likely to develop teary eyes, if anything at all.   This tip has been my #1 kitchen tip now for quite some time, and it works better than any other method of tear-prevention for onion cutting that I've tried in the past!

That sounds like a pretty good one.  I usually just let some one else cut the onion though.  LOL  Then again, I usually let some one else do most of the cooking I must admit.  I do canning and preserving since following the rules there is important but the cook does mos of the cooking since he can't be allowed to can without supervision.
TC this is great for wild duck which is very lean. Cut into thin slices about half inch thick strips. Marinade in cajun bottle marinade for the day in the fridge. Pull out and roll in italian bread crumbs and fry in hot olive oil with garlic and scallions in the oil. Eat hot as appetizers or finger food. yummy.

TCLynx said:
That sounds like a pretty good one.  I usually just let some one else cut the onion though.  LOL  Then again, I usually let some one else do most of the cooking I must admit.  I do canning and preserving since following the rules there is important but the cook does mos of the cooking since he can't be allowed to can without supervision.

Happy Cico de Mayo!  

If anyone would like to make some fresh guacamole, I posted my recipe to my blog.

http://mosesgonzales.wordpress.com/2011/05/05/world-famous-chunky-g...

 

Moses

here is a recipe for a stuffed-fish dish i made for my wife the 1st time i cooked for her (so i guess its good, she married me)  All amounts are approximate.

1/2 small white onion, diced

1/2 celery stalk, diced

1 cup toasted bread crumbs, wheat

1/3 cup butter

5 or 6 talapia fillets (or any white meat flaky fish)

salt and pepper to season

saute the onion and celery in a table spoon of butter until tender.  Let cool slightly and add bread crumbs and more melted butter until mixture is moist.  Coat bottom of baking pan with melted butter.  Using your fingers, place a enough bread filling on a filet (skin side) and roll it up.  Secure with toothpicks.  Fill all fillets and place in pan, brush with remaining butter. Add any left over filling on top of fish.  Bake at 350 in oven until fish is white and flakes when pierced with a fork.  Excellent served over a bed of wild rice.

Enjoy

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