Aquaponic Gardening

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I was wondering if anyone had access to something that could become hard copy curriculum for teaching and tracking. I Help home school my kids and leave it to my wife and I to transpose an abridged verson for them if all there is is adult material, besides I could use the help and direction for myself and spreading the wealth of AP system knowledge to others. also (reasons of discussion title) any other learning tips are welcome -not that you all don't cover me in this areas as it is! I just can't soak in enough right now. Thanks!

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I would start out with Chi's video

 

There are two sources of curricula that I know of, Adam.  Rebecca Nelson wrote one for home schoolers that you can see by clicking here.  A less pricey option is the book Classroom Hydroponic Plant Factory that you can see by clicking here. It's got some good experiments and content that are quite applicable to aquaponics.
Awesome. Yeah I have tried to contact my old high school science teacher who now has an AP system (DWC) at the school. I asked him for some curriculum but have not gotten a response I don't think - I haven't checked yet tonight. I also was pricing an expensive system that came with curriculum but didn't come to anything.

 My high school teacher got back with me and gave me some direction. I invited him to this site but he said that there was a student that was the brains of the operation -I did invite him too!

-but no curriculum from this lead yet.

Hey does anyone know the most direct rout to figuring out how to grow/produce enough food to feed a 5 member family? plan ideas, etc.?

 I have some ideas and yet have NEVER done anything this complete before.

     My family is in a transition that will turn everything around for us. My wife has the rent covered and it is my job (not that she doesn't help with everything) to calculate plan and implement something to cover all food + enough to sell to cover the rest of the bills. this way we have a plan in place for if the savings are deminished. This is something I will post several places to explain for redundancies as I am raising the chances that I catch someone that has a solution, has done this very thing, or has any ideas.

By the way, this is an exciting thing for our family and not a scary one. I have a lot of support from people as we are making this transition as they see the importance of this and what it can do for others that have less support than we do!

They may also not have support like this community in APG that I have been blessed with and we want to "teach them to fish". Thank you everyone!

Hi Adam. Sounds like an exciting time for you and your family - transition is usually a good thing in my experience. Scary? Sometimes. Change usually has a bit of that. But also an open opportunity to experience life from an entirely new vantage point. I sense a wonderful pioneering spirit in you that will serve you well in this endeavor!

With regard to producing enough food to feed your family I probably can't tell you anything you aren't already thinking, but here goes. I would be turning to the latest homesteading guides, in addition to aquaponics. You need dairy, meat, and grain as well as fish and veggies. Get a home grain mill, and grind your own flour and make your own bread - far more nutrition than store bought. I'd be sure to scour the Mother Earth News and Urban Farming sites. And start thinking about building a greenhouse. You are in Ohio, so temperature is a consideration. See if you can find "The Food and Heat Producing Solar Greenhouse" by Bill Yanda and Rick Fisher. This guide from 1979 was recommended to me by a couple who has built a few of them at 8000 ft in Colorado and they grow veggies all winter long with no added heat.

Just a few things that popped into my head as I pondered your new challenge.

There are also means to preserve a wider variety of foods in temperate climates using things like root cellars (this is always a bummer that they just don't work down here.)

 

A food dehydrator, big freezer and some canning equipment could make year round eating possible even if you can't grow year round.

Garden Web has a good harvest forum and people that can help with many food preservation questions.

 

You will have to decide how much of the diet has to be grown on site and what items you are still willing to purchase.  (Like will the family give up tea, coffee, and olive oil if you can't grow and produce them onsite? or do they get to be exceptions along with probably grain and sugar?)

thank you! yes I have begun a greenhouse but have it on hold (with the possibility that it is still moveable) as I have plans to move this farm to the country! but yes this is a good reminder to look up a friend who gets bulk grains! when we get into the country we plan to keep sheep -goats - who knows what else will happen! yes we are adventurous and feel that there is a blessing in pilgrimage.

Sylvia Bernstein said:
Hi Adam. Sounds like an exciting time for you and your family - transition is usually a good thing in my experience. Scary? Sometimes. Change usually has a bit of that. But also an open opportunity to experience life from an entirely new vantage point. I sense a wonderful pioneering spirit in you that will serve you well in this endeavor!

With regard to producing enough food to feed your family I probably can't tell you anything you aren't already thinking, but here goes. I would be turning to the latest homesteading guides, in addition to aquaponics. You need dairy, meat, and grain as well as fish and veggies. Get a home grain mill, and grind your own flour and make your own bread - far more nutrition than store bought. I'd be sure to scour the Mother Earth News and Urban Farming sites. And start thinking about building a greenhouse. You are in Ohio, so temperature is a consideration. See if you can find "The Food and Heat Producing Solar Greenhouse" by Bill Yanda and Rick Fisher. This guide from 1979 was recommended to me by a couple who has built a few of them at 8000 ft in Colorado and they grow veggies all winter long with no added heat.

Just a few things that popped into my head as I pondered your new challenge.

yes I do drink coffee and my wife tea. I may have some sort of monthly trip into town or whatever. ( I dream of being amish) My wife dehydrates and cans. we just need more to dry and store I guess. we are blessed and most likely will have more than I realize with just enough planning.
TCLynx said:

There are also means to preserve a wider variety of foods in temperate climates using things like root cellars (this is always a bummer that they just don't work down here.)

 

A food dehydrator, big freezer and some canning equipment could make year round eating possible even if you can't grow year round.

Garden Web has a good harvest forum and people that can help with many food preservation questions.

 

You will have to decide how much of the diet has to be grown on site and what items you are still willing to purchase.  (Like will the family give up tea, coffee, and olive oil if you can't grow and produce them onsite? or do they get to be exceptions along with probably grain and sugar?)

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