Aquaponic Gardening

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Who make the best pumps? What I'm looking for is the brands and of pumps that people are loyal too or wish they would of found sooner. I believe that I will probably go with four times what is asked by my system. This will make the pump last longer and give room for expansion. The dime is not in question here. It about the life of the pump how well it preforms noise, vibration, as well as gph for the price, length of life. Inline or sump? I will need all of the knowledge of the masters of AP. 

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Top shelf is Danner Pumps. Top Quality, Top Performance, Top Lasting, Top Service, Top Selection, TOP SHELF.

  http://www.dannermfg.com/Store/Defaultlanding.aspx

   I have a Jebao that is about a year old it comes with a two year warranty, pumps 3,150 GPH  is 110v.  I now have it pumping 9-10 ft high from the sump to the heat exchange and it works great my system is over 600 gallons. I just bought a back up pump that is similar on ebay that pumps 2,000 GPH for only $67.00 and it comes attached with a safety float switch and also has a two year warranty. Today I saw one for 54.xx for a buy it now. I always either buy too early or too late to get the best deals. :-P

I personally like the magdrive pumps http://www.theaquaponicstore.com/General-Purpose-Utility-Pump-2400-... that we carry on our store. I have used them for well over 10 years in salt water aquariums and you can beat the daylights out of them and they keep on running and when something does break its usually just an impeller fin and a cheap fix. I have run anything you can imagine through them including chiller for a beer system they work GREAT!

Glenn I will check Danner out, thank. Steve what is the gph on these pumps? I will push probably 14 to 15 feet in height. I do have a 55 gal fish tank in the living room and runs on a Fluval 304 with live plants. I have not breached the idea of turning this into AP with the wife as of yet.

I also like the magdrive pumps you carry in your store :) I've had good results so far with the ActiveAqua pumps.

Steve R said:

I personally like the magdrive pumps http://www.theaquaponicstore.com/General-Purpose-Utility-Pump-2400-... that we carry on our store. I have used them for well over 10 years in salt water aquariums and you can beat the daylights out of them and they keep on running and when something does break its usually just an impeller fin and a cheap fix. I have run anything you can imagine through them including chiller for a beer system they work GREAT!

you've got to be kidding

Anthony Payne said:

 I will push probably 14 to 15 feet in height. 

Anthony, Do you mean 14 to 15 inches instead of feet? normally speaking, pond and aquarium pumps are considered to be fractional horsepower pumps and fall off the performance charts above 15 feet and or 4000 gph. I checked the Fluval 304 ratings and it looks to have an optimum flow rate requirement of 260 gph.
 

For that kind of height and so little flow needed, I would suggest using air lift instead of fluid/pond pumps.
Anthony Payne said:

Glenn I will check Danner out, thank. Steve what is the gph on these pumps? I will push probably 14 to 15 feet in height. I do have a 55 gal fish tank in the living room and runs on a Fluval 304 with live plants. I have not breached the idea of turning this into AP with the wife as of yet.

I have been thinking of a waterfall water feature for aerating of the water, tumbling it on a wall of cone cups running into each other making run into the two fish tanks on the back wall like moving art with pleasant sounds. Maybe make in the shape of a fish as the water would run off the head and tail. This will be made out of stainless 16- 18 GA sheet metal and take a torch to it, to tint an uneven bluing look. With the fish being in the Coastal Native carving of the NW. My plans are GH at 10 feet and if the sump sunken 4 feet then 14 feet over all hight

  http://www.your-garden-ponds-center.com/waterfall-pump-calculator.html

This chart and site should help in deciding required pump for any water fall. I think it's most important to know the total vertical height from the top of the pump if submerged to the highest point of delivery. And to consider total pipe or hose length if t meanders more than a couple inches from a straight line between the two points.

That does sound like intriguing wall art.  To come up with the rate, it might help to know the total wet surface area and the sound limits both min and max.. 

Mechanical noise. And aeration  can be played with to fit the functionality and enjoyment of the art after the pump requirements are established in stone if you will. Hope this helps.


Thanks Glenn this will be a good start.
Glenn said:

  http://www.your-garden-ponds-center.com/waterfall-pump-calculator.html

This chart and site should help in deciding required pump for any water fall. I think it's most important to know the total vertical height from the top of the pump if submerged to the highest point of delivery. And to consider total pipe or hose length if t meanders more than a couple inches from a straight line between the two points.

That does sound like intriguing wall art.  To come up with the rate, it might help to know the total wet surface area and the sound limits both min and max.. 

Mechanical noise. And aeration  can be played with to fit the functionality and enjoyment of the art after the pump requirements are established in stone if you will. Hope this helps.

Not from the surface of the water for a submerged pump?  

Anthony Payne said:


I think it's most important to know the total vertical height from the top of the pump if submerged to the highest point of delivery. 


That's correct George. From the top of the pump.  The water in the sump or well etc. above the pump actually adds to the strength of the lifting ability as a higher suction pressure exists than if the pump were at the surface height or higher than the source water. Some folks use to think middle of the pump but that's not right. The manufactures today all use the "top of the pump" in their design and specification calcs.
George said:

Not from the surface of the water for a submerged pump?  

Anthony Payne said:


I think it's most important to know the total vertical height from the top of the pump if submerged to the highest point of delivery. 

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