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Greetings - our N and P system requires that we remove up to five gallons of water per day.

Generally we add to beds or trees so as not to waste.

I am curious though - can one pasteurize, bottle and preserve to resell through our markets?

Any insight is appreciated.

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There is a process you can go through to pasteurize your "fish water".  The nutrients will still be there, and a valuable source of nutrients for plants.  The pasteurization will however kill all the beneficial microbes present that are a huge benefit to soils and the conversion  of nutrients to their plant available forms and in absorbtion.  You will need to be sure that you label this carefully.  States have varying regulations as to what you can call such a liquid (such as "fertilizer' or "soil amendment" etc.). If you sell commercially you will have to be sure that it consistently containts what you say it does on the lable.  This will mean that what you feed the fish (that goes into the make-up of the water, and volume and the quality of their poop), whether you have redworms in a media bed will all effect the water you remove from your system as far as these contents are concerned.  This is that same thing that those who sell bottled "worm casting tea"  in stores have to deal with.

    Can you avoid pasteurization and still sell the stuff.  Yes, and no.  Yes you could sell it fresh at a Farmers' Market or off your farm as a fresh product, not sealed up in an air-tight container.  Here's the "no": If you seal it up without pasteurization you will have a growing petri-dish effect and run the risk of bombing someone's prized garden with an ooze that can kill their soil, plants and such....

  We brew  fresh redworm casting tea at our Redworm Farm in 55 gallon drums that goes to various organic farms, vineyards and homes.  We are very careful about our claims, and we will only provide it fresh.  This way we know it is a top quality product and will be a benefit and not a liability.This would be the same for any "fish water" product  from your place.  Really look into your state laws.  Know your process and your product. 

  I hope this is helpful in your decision making process.

  Others may have input that is more specific to the water strictly from AP systems.

 

I appreciate your time - great information, thank you.

Converse said:

There is a process you can go through to pasteurize your "fish water".  The nutrients will still be there, and a valuable source of nutrients for plants.  The pasteurization will however kill all the beneficial microbes present that are a huge benefit to soils and the conversion  of nutrients to their plant available forms and in absorbtion.  You will need to be sure that you label this carefully.  States have varying regulations as to what you can call such a liquid (such as "fertilizer' or "soil amendment" etc.). If you sell commercially you will have to be sure that it consistently containts what you say it does on the lable.  This will mean that what you feed the fish (that goes into the make-up of the water, and volume and the quality of their poop), whether you have redworms in a media bed will all effect the water you remove from your system as far as these contents are concerned.  This is that same thing that those who sell bottled "worm casting tea"  in stores have to deal with.

    Can you avoid pasteurization and still sell the stuff.  Yes, and no.  Yes you could sell it fresh at a Farmers' Market or off your farm as a fresh product, not sealed up in an air-tight container.  Here's the "no": If you seal it up without pasteurization you will have a growing petri-dish effect and run the risk of bombing someone's prized garden with an ooze that can kill their soil, plants and such....

  We brew  fresh redworm casting tea at our Redworm Farm in 55 gallon drums that goes to various organic farms, vineyards and homes.  We are very careful about our claims, and we will only provide it fresh.  This way we know it is a top quality product and will be a benefit and not a liability.This would be the same for any "fish water" product  from your place.  Really look into your state laws.  Know your process and your product. 

  I hope this is helpful in your decision making process.

  Others may have input that is more specific to the water strictly from AP systems.

 

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