Aquaponic Gardening

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Has anyone ever tried to grow Ginseng in AP. I've been looking into growing Ginseng for a while now and find that it requires very specific site conditions that at first doesn't seem like it would work in AP, But i have heard of (other) root crops working in AP. Maybe special beds or media. I may try a dirt bed with drip irrigation from my system. Any suggestions?

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Could you give us what specific conditions they need? A airy, light medium almost certainly would be appropriate, however, since it's a root crop.

Wicking bed maybe?

Haven't I read that they take up to 4 yrs. to sprout and 7 yrs. to maturity? I have them planted in our woods for 2 yrs. now (this is one of the most prolific areas in the US for ginseng) and I still see nothing sprouted.

That's a long haul in an AP GB Just say'n.

Very interesting topic none the less. Very valuable crop. Very restricted pick'ns in the wild here. Poaching carries heavy fines and yet I know locals that pick $7k in a summer.

Here is a lonk to growing Ginseng

http://www.hardingsginsengfarm.com/cultivate.htm

excellent read

Some stolen quotes from: http://www.hardingsginsengfarm.com/cultivate.htm

Ginseng is sometimes a difficult plant to grow. It is a plant that requires commitment for the fact that roots are best when left to maturity for 5-10 years. It is a committed gardener that decides to plant a crop, waiting 5-10 years to harvest the best and most potent roots is a task filled with risk, patience, and an eye to the distant future.

I would go to their site to learn more. It is a very tricky crop and is MUCH less valuable if obviously "cultivated" It must appear "wild" to be of value.

Sorry Bob, seems we were on the same page at the same time

Bob Terrell said:

Here is a lonk to growing Ginseng

http://www.hardingsginsengfarm.com/cultivate.htm

excellent read

Great minds think alike. lol
 
Jim Fisk said:

Sorry Bob, seems we were on the same page at the same time

Bob Terrell said:

Here is a lonk to growing Ginseng

http://www.hardingsginsengfarm.com/cultivate.htm

excellent read

Im thinking that wild Ginseng is most valuable, But if i could grow totally organic AP Ginseng it may have more value than wild. Of course i would have to create a market for it through a life time commitment of raising and marketing. Sounds like a challenge!

Tall long term task. More power to you. I think I'll leave mine "cultivated" in the wild. Years ago (30) I had a neighbor in Jonesborough TN that transplanted it from the wild into a locust grove and planted a new section about 10 x 20 each year and it looked very healthy on flat ground. He first had to get the Locust trees growing in what had been an open field so he had a long term plan as well. Wish I could remember which house it was (drove by the area a month ago and all was sooo different) as we live about an hr. away now, having moved back to this beautiful area after 30 yrs. in New England. I'd love to see how he is doing with it. Nice cash crop. About equal to pot but no raids well at least by the Popo.

Tony Gilliam said:

Im thinking that wild Ginseng is most valuable, But if i could grow totally organic AP Ginseng it may have more value than wild. Of course i would have to create a market for it through a life time commitment of raising and marketing. Sounds like a challenge!

From the research i've done, it takes 2 seasons of freezing and thawing to get the seeds to sprout. I'm thinking this would have to be done in dirt, in perfect conditions. My thoughts are to transplant them to a flood and drain grow bed and uproot and replant each year, so the roots take on a twisted look that is desireable. Im thinking that if the flood and drain cycles were slowed down the tap root would branch out more to reach the water level, also a desireable caracteristic.

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