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Has anyone used or is using an external that pumps about 4200 GPH?  I'm expanding my system and I'm looking at a sequence 750 series......www.sequencepumpsale.com.  Based on what i have read, it uses about 160Watts which is better that a 345 Watt submersible that I'm presently using.

 

Does anyone have any other pump suggestion?

 

 

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How many feet of head do you have and what flow rate are you looking for? I see over 4000 but what is your ideal flow rate? 5000? 5500?

4500 would be perfect...

 

I have the sequence 750 pump running on my system for a little over a year now. Other than when I jambed it up with bio balls it has run perfectly. It's extremely quiet and consistant. Unless you have 0 head I wouldn't count on getting any where near 4500 gph.  Mine lifts 5' of height through about 25' of 1 1/2" pipe with 6 90 degree elbows. If I open the discharge valve all the way I might get 1200 gph, I keep it throttled back to about 600 gph which turns the water in my fish tank every hour and draws a little less power.

 

I just bought one at eh conference.  I didn't buy the primer pot.  Can it work good without it to pull water about 3 feet up before it is pumped to a bio filter about 5 feet up?

Stephen Corbett said:

I have the sequence 750 pump running on my system for a little over a year now. Other than when I jambed it up with bio balls it has run perfectly. It's extremely quiet and consistant. Unless you have 0 head I wouldn't count on getting any where near 4500 gph.  Mine lifts 5' of height through about 25' of 1 1/2" pipe with 6 90 degree elbows. If I open the discharge valve all the way I might get 1200 gph, I keep it throttled back to about 600 gph which turns the water in my fish tank every hour and draws a little less power.

 

I can't say how difficult it would be to prime. I can say that 3 feet of suction is equal to 10 or more feet of head. If at all possible reconfigure your system to eliminate any suction at all it will pay off tremendously. All pumps will push much more efficiently than they will suck. For me having positive pressure at the suction port of my pump is a primary cosideration.

Tropical Aquaponics said:
I just bought one at eh conference.  I didn't buy the primer pot.  Can it work good without it to pull water about 3 feet up before it is pumped to a bio filter about 5 feet up?

Stephen Corbett said:

I have the sequence 750 pump running on my system for a little over a year now. Other than when I jambed it up with bio balls it has run perfectly. It's extremely quiet and consistant. Unless you have 0 head I wouldn't count on getting any where near 4500 gph.  Mine lifts 5' of height through about 25' of 1 1/2" pipe with 6 90 degree elbows. If I open the discharge valve all the way I might get 1200 gph, I keep it throttled back to about 600 gph which turns the water in my fish tank every hour and draws a little less power.

 

Head pressure is head pressure, there is no difference whether it is on the suction side or discharge.

As for your dilema, that would depend on whether the S750 is self priming or not. If not, you have to have some way to initially fill the suction line on the pump. If you didn't get a pump trap, I would instal a 3way T with a ball valve on the vertical portion right before the inlet of the pump. Open the valve, fill it, close it, then start the pump. Also make sure to install a check valve below the water level on your suction side so it stays primed! Hope this helps!!

Stephen Corbett said:
I can't say how difficult it would be to prime. I can say that 3 feet of suction is equal to 10 or more feet of head. If at all possible reconfigure your system to eliminate any suction at all it will pay off tremendously. All pumps will push much more efficiently than they will suck. For me having positive pressure at the suction port of my pump is a primary cosideration.

Tropical Aquaponics said:
I just bought one at eh conference.  I didn't buy the primer pot.  Can it work good without it to pull water about 3 feet up before it is pumped to a bio filter about 5 feet up?

Stephen Corbett said:

I have the sequence 750 pump running on my system for a little over a year now. Other than when I jambed it up with bio balls it has run perfectly. It's extremely quiet and consistant. Unless you have 0 head I wouldn't count on getting any where near 4500 gph.  Mine lifts 5' of height through about 25' of 1 1/2" pipe with 6 90 degree elbows. If I open the discharge valve all the way I might get 1200 gph, I keep it throttled back to about 600 gph which turns the water in my fish tank every hour and draws a little less power.

 

I have to admit I'm guilty of exageration here. You're right that head pressure is calculated the same on both the suction and discharge side of the pump. Practically speaking, IMO, there is a big difference. Manufacturers installation guidelines almost always recommend as close to a flooded suction as possible. I think one is almost always better off with a flooded suction. I can eliminate two valves and rest easier knowing I'm not going to lose the prime due to a power outage and a piece of debris in my check valve.

Ryan said:
Head pressure is head pressure, there is no difference whether it is on the suction side or discharge.

As for your dilema, that would depend on whether the S750 is self priming or not. If not, you have to have some way to initially fill the suction line on the pump. If you didn't get a pump trap, I would instal a 3way T with a ball valve on the vertical portion right before the inlet of the pump. Open the valve, fill it, close it, then start the pump. Also make sure to install a check valve below the water level on your suction side so it stays primed! Hope this helps!!

Stephen Corbett said:
I can't say how difficult it would be to prime. I can say that 3 feet of suction is equal to 10 or more feet of head. If at all possible reconfigure your system to eliminate any suction at all it will pay off tremendously. All pumps will push much more efficiently than they will suck. For me having positive pressure at the suction port of my pump is a primary cosideration.

Tropical Aquaponics said:
I just bought one at eh conference.  I didn't buy the primer pot.  Can it work good without it to pull water about 3 feet up before it is pumped to a bio filter about 5 feet up?

Stephen Corbett said:

I have the sequence 750 pump running on my system for a little over a year now. Other than when I jambed it up with bio balls it has run perfectly. It's extremely quiet and consistant. Unless you have 0 head I wouldn't count on getting any where near 4500 gph.  Mine lifts 5' of height through about 25' of 1 1/2" pipe with 6 90 degree elbows. If I open the discharge valve all the way I might get 1200 gph, I keep it throttled back to about 600 gph which turns the water in my fish tank every hour and draws a little less power.

 

Well sure flooded suction is ideal which is why the pump makers will suggest it b/c like you said, you can eliminate the chance of a check valve failing but if you have a sump buried in the ground, flooded suction isnt exactly an option if you are using a centrifugal pump (unless you dig the pump down and build a french drain or something so the pump doesnt flood). Truthfully, the sump should be the cleanest tank in your system so as long as you maintain the check valve seal (wipe it every couple weeks) you shouldnt have any problems.

With a sump buried in the ground is when I go to a submersible pump. What you can do with a pump is one thing, what I would choose to do when my goal is to keep my system as simple to operate and maintenance free as possible is another thing. The point of my comments wasn't to say other things aren't possible, but to direct attention to what my 40+ years experience with centrifugal pumps says is most practical.


  I am sure there are times when having lift on the suction side is the only or even the best alternative. I am just saying that in my experience if you could avoid it your system would be much better off for it.
Ryan said:

Well sure flooded suction is ideal which is why the pump makers will suggest it b/c like you said, you can eliminate the chance of a check valve failing but if you have a sump buried in the ground, flooded suction isnt exactly an option if you are using a centrifugal pump (unless you dig the pump down and build a french drain or something so the pump doesnt flood). Truthfully, the sump should be the cleanest tank in your system so as long as you maintain the check valve seal (wipe it every couple weeks) you shouldnt have any problems.

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