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I can't keep fish alive anymore. It all started after I added a new small float bed using PVC liner and forgetting to turn off the tap hose and flooding my 180 gal system with too much chlorinated water. My fish were eating well that day and all died after 5 days. After cycling for 2 weeks, I added 10 more goldfish and all died within the next week, one or two per day. Never high ammonia levels and pH is around 6.9 to 7.1 with a temp of 72. Will a total water change now be enough? Can styrofoam or PVC liners be toxic? Could I have something bad in my grow beds, which are filled with expanded clay pellets?

I would love some help.

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Hi Len,

Sorry I seemed to be missing out on the discussion, errands occupying my time

Can you find the manufacturer of the liner and do some inquirers on this particular product ? An MSDS would shed some light. From there you will have a better idea of what you'll need to do with the rest of the system.

Thanks,  I think I am going to change the liner just to rule it out.
 
Harold Sukhbir said:

Hi Len,

Sorry I seemed to be missing out on the discussion, errands occupying my time

Can you find the manufacturer of the liner and do some inquirers on this particular product ? An MSDS would shed some light. From there you will have a better idea of what you'll need to do with the rest of the system.

Hi Len,

If you're going to go that far, then it should be a good idea to clean the system and start a cycling again. It will be added work but at least you'll be more on the safe side.

Apart from changing the water and liner, would you do anything else?

Hi Len,

To be on the safe side rinse/wash/clean as much of the media/FT as you possibly can...just flush the system as much as you can and then start cycling!

Thanks, that sounds like a good plan

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