Aquaponic Gardening

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I'm interested in starting to grow brine shrimps. I've searched the Internet a lot about these but I keep getting different information. Does someone on here know how to grow them to give me tips? Starting from eggs to adults. I know how to make the hatchery already. But how many salt should I put in? And can you really use uniodized salt instead?

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I have raised many many pounds of brine shrimp and the biggest issue become water quality. As far as salinity goes you want them in the same range as a salt water tank with a specific gravity of 1.020 - .025 or 25 to 30 ppt. I wouldn't use non-iodized salt the iodine will help with egg rot. I would just go buy the cheapest salt water aquarium salt you can get. To feed them make up water to the same salinity with an air stone and put it in your window. Then use the single celled algae to feed your brine. Why are you breeding them? I might be able to suggest an easier alternative food.



Steve R said:

I have raised many many pounds of brine shrimp and the biggest issue become water quality. As far as salinity goes you want them in the same range as a salt water tank with a specific gravity of 1.020 - .025 or 25 to 30 ppt. I wouldn't use non-iodized salt the iodine will help with egg rot. I would just go buy the cheapest salt water aquarium salt you can get. To feed them make up water to the same salinity with an air stone and put it in your window. Then use the single celled algae to feed your brine. Why are you breeding them? I might be able to suggest an easier alternative food.


I live close to the sea, can I use that water too? I live in Curaçao by the way. Because I'm not 100% our pet stores here have the aquarium salt. Will call them tomorrow.
I'm breeding them to feed tilapia. I heard they have lots of protein which is good for tilapia.
Only your baby fish will eat them. If the sea Is clean or u have no other option then use sea water but other wise I wouldn't risk contamination.
OK. I will ask for aquarium salt. Hoe much should I put in?
A good store will sell premade if not you will need to buy a hydrometer to measure how much salt you mix in. Either ask the pet shop worker how to read it or let me know what you got and I'll help you read it. There are a few different kinds.

Brine shrimp aren't a great source of food, unless you gut-load them. That means feeding the brine shrimp high nutritional value supplements right before you feed them to the fish.  Otherwise brine shrimp are more like candy.

If you want to grow nutritious food for your fish, how about compost worms, black soldier fly larvae, or gammarus shrimp? Gammarus is a freshwater species, so it stays alive when you put it in to feed the fish. 

Also look at azolla and duckweed. Azolla is 25-35% protein by dry weight! 



Scott Roberts said:

Brine shrimp aren't a great source of food, unless you gut-load them. That means feeding the brine shrimp high nutritional value supplements right before you feed them to the fish.  Otherwise brine shrimp are more like candy.

If you want to grow nutritious food for your fish, how about compost worms, black soldier fly larvae, or gammarus shrimp? Gammarus is a freshwater species, so it stays alive when you put it in to feed the fish. 

Also look at azolla and duckweed. Azolla is 25-35% protein by dry weight! 


I can get some of that Gammarus pulex from a friend. They got into his pond out of nowhere. I just found out about them yesterday.
My compost worms don't do very well.
What do those gammarus eat?


Steve R said:
A good store will sell premade if not you will need to buy a hydrometer to measure how much salt you mix in. Either ask the pet shop worker how to read it or let me know what you got and I'll help you read it. There are a few different kinds.

Ok I will ask them. Thanks! :)

Gammarus eat decaying leaves. Preferences can vary but alder, elm, oak, beech, willow and maple leaves are known to be food sources, along with fungus growing on the leaves.  Most references talk about using a trash can with a layer of leaves on the bottom of it as a culture container. An air driven sponge filter would provide gentle water movement, increased oxygenation, and help ensure water quality stays healthy.

An article from the international journal of zoology about gammarus dietary needs can be found here (http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijz/2011/294394/#B4)

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